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ECT News Community   »   MacNewsWorld Talkback   »   Re: Raiders of the Lost iPhone



Re: Raiders of the Lost iPhone
Posted by: Brian T. Horowitz 2010-04-27 13:51:01
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Gizmodo editor Jason Chen's home was raided by the Silicon Valley High Technology Task Force on Friday following the tech blog's recent purchase of an Apple iPhone prototype. Authorities seized four computers and two servers during the raid. The raid followed the alleged theft of the iPhone after Gray Powell, an engineer at Apple, reportedly walked out of the Gourmet Haus Staudt in Redwood City, Calif., leaving the phone on a barstool. After publishing its scoop on the iPhone prototype, Gizmodo said it returned the device to Apple.


Theft = Journalism?
Posted by: farmerbob 2010-04-28 20:25:39 In reply to: Brian T. Horowitz
Everybody with an ounce of decency knows that if something is left in a bar or restaurant, you give it to the bartender or a waitperson. Case closed. But this was taken many steps further and the initial (criminal) steps were theft long before journalism ever started. Keeping it, then selling it, and someone buying it, is a crime. Two parties are at fault. If it were a boring Blackberry, would all of this had happened? Probably not, since Apple's shroud of mystery places an accelerated sense of worth, need to possess, urgency to be first to break the news, which is Apple's fault. But it does not excuse a "journalist" from perpetrating a crime to "get the scoop". That's what they are investigating. And Mr. Chen's actions may have put all journalists in jeopardy, which probably never dawned on him while he was "getting his scoop". Mr. Chen is not a "journalist", but an accomplice to theft or at least in possession of stolen property. It is pathetic to hide behind "being a journalist" as a defense. And Mr. Chen has opened a very large and condemning can of worms for all journalists. Me included. Sir, you should be ashamed of yourself. You uncovered nothing at we did not already know or suspect. Was it worth it?

Do we really know what's coming up?
Posted by: tony4life 2010-04-27 14:02:41 In reply to: Brian T. Horowitz
The seizure of Mr. Chen's equipment may only have been a preventative measure. The authorities may only be storing the items in order to avoid erasure of any data that may be pertinent to their investigation. The SVHT Task Force may still have to stand in front of a judge with Jason Chen present (with legal representation) in order to discuss exactly what they hope to find before being allowed access to the computers and servers. Who knows what they are truly looking for but I hope the court holds the task force to the same standards they've held in the past. Don't get me wrong, the problems started once the prototype iPhone was taken and not immediately returned to Apple. If Mr. Chen paid someone money for the iPhone and immediately returned it to Apple, he may have been thanks AND possibly even reimbursed. For Mr. Chen to take it and report on it to the degree he did is a matter for the District Attorney to investigate. Of course, like any law enforcement arm, the task force also has rules (laws) to follow and avoid breaking. It'll be very interesting to see how this investigation evolves!
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