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ECT News Community   »   TechNewsWorld Talkback   »   Re: How BlackBerry Could Make Voting From Smartphones Secure



Re: How BlackBerry Could Make Voting From Smartphones Secure
Posted by: Rob Enderle 2020-04-13 12:16:10
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Some states defaulted to mail-in ballots some time ago, and their elections are unconstrained by the pandemic. However, in many parts of the U.S. the prevailing attitude is that the Web lacks enough security for elections. That seems odd, given that we now use the Internet to manage our finances, our healthcare, our businesses, our travel -- and now our shopping, including for food. The existing election hardware is aging and largely unsecure. No one seems to have the budget to replace it. While we can make smartphones secure, we mostly don't.


Re: How BlackBerry Could Make Voting From Smartphones Secure
Posted by: borisaman 2020-04-27 06:58:23 In reply to: Rob Enderle
Voting, the illusion of choice for patriotic zombies. When will the masses understand the world is run by mafia banking criminals

Re: How BlackBerry Could Make Voting From Smartphones Secure
Posted by: DocEDC 2020-04-14 12:14:01 In reply to: Rob Enderle
Your ignorance of the electoral process is stunning. Square your wholly ignorant "great idea" of voter receipts with the fundamental tenet of voter anonymity... I'll be over here with popcorn. Did you *really* think you're the first person to ever get a light bulb over the head with "voter receipts"?

Did you do any actual research before blathering off this "piece"?

Re: How BlackBerry Could Make Voting From Smartphones Secure
Posted by: just4kicks 2020-04-13 12:45:12 In reply to: Rob Enderle
Let's make election day a national holiday so people don't need to take off from work to vote. Paper ballots only with ID required at the polling place, with exceptions for absentee ballots that are certified and include identification. Regardless of the fact that we bank and use other critical services online and with our phones, electronic voting is ripe for fraud. I still want to place my ballot in the box myself. Yes, I'm trusting that it will be delivered successfully to be tabulated correctly. But tapping "Submit" on my phone or computer screen and trusting the electoral system doesn't work for me. We've all seen the warnings when making a payment or submitting an order online "Only click once to submit your order." That's because there are millions of times when orders, payments, forms, etc have been duplicated sometimes ten-fold or more by human and/or system errors. Same thing can easily happen with voting, and that's before we take fraud into account.

I also need to push back on the statement "Because BlackBerry is a Canadian firm, it has no real skin in the game for any U.S. election." I'm not saying that BlackBerry is politically biased one way or the other. Fact is I don't know. But how can you assert that a company "has no real skin in the game for any U.S. election" based on the fact they are located in Canada? That infers that no Canadian company is interested in who wins or loses U.S. elections. Given the amount of commerce that is done between the U.S. and Canada, in addition to many cross-border policies, this is illogical.
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Which Big Tech CEO that testified at the Congressional Antitrust Hearing on July 29 is the most trustworthy?
Jeff Bezos of Amazon
Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook
Sundar Pichai of Google
Tim Cook of Apple
All of them are equally trustworthy to some extent.
None of them are trustworthy whatsoever.