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ECT News Community   »   TechNewsWorld Talkback   »   Re: Google Killed the Laptop Star



Re: Google Killed the Laptop Star
Posted by: Rob Enderle 2016-02-29 07:23:35
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Anyone who went to business school recognizes the basic tenet that you use marketing to build demand in order to sell products. Through the 1990s, there was impressive marketing surrounding laptops. Apple aggressively marketed this class, as did Microsoft, and it seemed every other brand on TV was trying to convince us we needed a new PC. PC marketing dropped off a cliff in the last decade, and when the iPad launched with a powerful Apple campaign it nearly took out the PC at the knees. What happened in the 1990s that killed PC marketing?


Re: Google Killed the Laptop Star
Posted by: jescott418 2016-03-01 08:58:01 In reply to: Rob Enderle
I never understood Microsoft's race to the bottom myself with cheap and poorly made netbooks. This was before Google and Chromebooks. But was it all Microsoft's fault or was it more the PC makers desperate to find more buyers?
In the end Chromebooks are nothing more then a browser with hardware. Yet Microsoft felt the need to push those cheap and slow notebooks meant to be "Chrome busters".
Failing to understand that it takes more then the same hardware in a Chromebook to make Windows run well.
OK, so Windows 10 fixed some of that sluggishness, but only partially.What I give Apple credit for is sticking with a product that is premium and not moving beyond that to try and capture a low end margin market. This resulted in Apple never really gaining a lot of market share with Mac's or iPads. But certainly has not lost a lot of profit either. I do credit Microsoft for building up a decent Surface line and yet, I get the feeling the PC maker still can't figure out a decent business strategy. Which is mainly offer midrange to premium Windows PC's and leave the cheap stuff to Chromebooks and Chromeboxes. Otherwise, you taint the perception of Windows being a lousy OS which is not true on decent hardware. But is true on bottom end hardware.

Re: Google Killed the Laptop Star
Posted by: Rob999 2016-02-29 08:16:53 In reply to: Rob Enderle
Sorry, but this is BS. Google doesn't account for much at all in the PC market. They weren't even a household name in the 90's. All they were was a search engine. What killed the PC market is a culmination of a number of key factors:

1) Microsoft finally got seen as the car salesman that kept selling you the same car with a different coat of paint on it and the steering wheel positions swapped.

2) PC's had more competition from Chromebook, Linux and Apple devices combined.

3) People are smarter about how their devices work, so they know they don't have to have a Windows machine to do everything.

4) Games have made their way into Apple and Linux worlds more than they ever did. Games are a popular past-time for both the hardcore and the casual gamer. Casual games made other devices fun to use, more accessible and popular.

5) Most people are not tech heavy-hitters, and therefore were simply looking for something they can browse the web and check email or message with.

6) Most PCs look boxy and un-apologetically bland compared to other devices on the market.

7) People got sick of bloatware installed on their machines when they buy them. Between MS, the hardware vendor, and any number of other agencies vying for attention, the user can't simply use the machine as it was intended. We spend more time managing the machines, instead of having them manage us.

Those are the reasons PC sales have declined. Google is but one small factor among many.

Re: Google Killed the Laptop Star
Posted by: RobEnderle 2016-03-01 15:02:06 In reply to: Rob999
I think you are missing the relation between marketing/demand generation, and actual demand. Apple stopped marketing the iPod and it is all but gone from the market. My point is more that Google's entry into the segment which helped collapse margins had an adverse impact on marketing dollars which pays Google's bills. Other than Microsoft Surface, which is enjoying impressive growth, no one, not even Apple, is marketing PCs in line with other consumer choices anymore. And Smartphone marketing, Apple and Samsung aside, has fallen into a hole as well (and numbers there are starting to degrade).
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