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ECT News Community   »   E-Commerce Times Talkback   »   Re: Slippery Statistics Suggest Online Piracy Is on the Wane



Re: Slippery Statistics Suggest Online Piracy Is on the Wane
Posted by: Erika Morphy 2012-11-08 16:11:27
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Sandvine has released a new report on global Internet traffic that points to the growth of online data consumption and implies that the increasing use of legitimate content services such as Netflix may be softening the impact of illegal P2P file-sharing. At face value, that seems difficult to believe. "Online piracy is booming by any measure," said industry analyst Jeff Kagan. "I don't see how anyone could conclude it's not." Internet data usage is surging. In the past year, it increased by 120 percent on North American fixed-line networks.


Re: Slippery Statistics Suggest Online Piracy Is on the Wane
Posted by: ethicalfan 2012-11-08 16:14:17 In reply to: Erika Morphy
Why is there so much confusion surrounding the facts that p2p piracy grew by 40% year over year? Cisco stated that North America used an average of 9,947 Petabytes (1 million Gigabytes) a month in 2011. Sandvine says that overall volume has increased 120% in 2012 over 2011. If we assume that means that in 2012, North America used an average of 11,936 Petabytes (1 million Gigabytes) a month and we assume that one movie is 1 GB, that is 143 Billion movies if it was all movies. Its not all movies. It is software like Microsoft Word and Rosetta Stone. It is everything ever recorded by any artist you can name. It is every video game.

Pro-piracy advocates say that we just need to accept piracy and that artists need to get a new business model. This is false. The $400B US telecom industry needs to follow the law. The Sandvine report goes on to state that 42% of all US upstream traffic is used for peer-to-peer “filesharing.” Why is 42% of all US upstream traffic is used for peer-to-peer “filesharing?” US law says that ISPs only have safe harbor from their liability due to their subscribers illegally distributing content if they have a policy for terminating repeat infringers (17 USC 512 (i). If US ISPs had a policy for terminating repeat infringers, 42% of all US upstream internet traffic would not be used to illegall distribute music, movies, games, software and ebooks.
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