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ECT News Community   »   CRM Buyer Talkback   »   Re: The Most Desirable Customer Data Plays Hardest to Get



Re: The Most Desirable Customer Data Plays Hardest to Get
Posted by: Christopher J. Bucholtz 2012-11-29 13:56:39
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As a callow youth, I enlisted in the Navy and found myself at sea aboard the USS Gray as a bosun's mate. That meant standing a lot of watch on the bridge, and being on the bridge meant knowing how to report positions of other things based on a 360-degree arc. The idea was to have a 360-degree view of what was out there -- primarily so we didn't run into it. We had radar, and it provided a nice idea of the large items that were around us; all the contacts were written on a Plexiglas board on the bridge, with continual updates coming from the people manning the radar scopes.


Re: The Most Desirable Customer Data Plays Hardest to Get
Posted by: John-Paul_Narowski 2012-11-30 07:12:36 In reply to: Christopher J. Bucholtz
I think this is absolutely right. Purchasing and browsing activity, despite how much they reveal, are still only one small part of what makes a customer tick. But we want to believe in their predictive power because that whole notion of the complete, numbers-driven wraparound system is the dream CRMs are made of. After all, anyone with a rudimentary database system (hey, anyone with a pretty good spreadsheet!) can record contact information, purchases, contact history, and so on. Users have to think of a CRM as not a way to make their work just a mechanical process of data entry, but as a way to facilitate--not replace--the kind of real relationship-building that leads to repeat business and general goodwill.

John-Paul Narowski - founder of karmaCRM
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What do you think about Hillary Clinton's use of private email servers during her term as Secretary of State?
She broke the law and should go to jail.
She violated guidelines -- the issue is overblown.
She placed important state department information at risk.
Her servers might have been more secure than the government's.
I really don't care one way or the other.